Forum Thread: "running" file

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Furty "running" file
Contributor 3rd Mar, 2013 14:40
Ranking: 101
Posts: 4
User Since: 19th Dec, 2007
System Score: N/A
Location: DE
Last edited on 3rd Mar, 2013 14:41

A file named "running" is created several times a second in "C:\Program Files (x86)\Secunia\PSI\SUA" according to http://www.softwareok.com/?seite=Freeware/LauschAn... (or http://live.sysinternals.com/Procmon.exe).

I would suggest to do it not more often than every 5 seconds because:
- it could reduce the life of my SSD
- it could partly cause the performance issues, that are reported by many users.
For example it was reported to me, that a netbook with Atom processor was considerably slower after i had installed PSI.

This user no longer exists RE: "running" file
Secunia Official 4th Mar, 2013 10:46
It sounds like the PSI was currently auto-updating some program on your computer. Did you notice if that was the case?

I have never personally noticed any slowdown caused by the PSI except when it is scanning. I suspect a currently running auto-update could also cause some slowdown.
Furty RE: "running" file
Contributor 5th Mar, 2013 01:24
Score: 101
Posts: 4
User Since: 19th Dec 2007
System Score: N/A
Location: DE
No the behaviour is constant without any updates installed by PSI or a manual scan.
In only 2 hours the "running" file was created/deleted more than 12000 times on my system, as shown by the mentioned tool.
So would you please ask development to reduce the number of writes or make it configurable?
On my system with Core i5 CPU, PSI's behaviour should only reduce the SSD life.

But you should be aware already, that other users are regularly complaining about machine slowdowns with PSI 3 (not version 2). I believe working on the above issue could decrease PSI's (idle) system load - especially important for machines with slow Atom CPUs (e.g. netbooks).
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